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2010 Open Source CMS Market Share Report Lists concrete5 as Growing Fast

The Water and Stone annual Open Source CMS Market Share Report compares the players in the very crowded space of WCM and CMS with clear analytics. Last year concrete5 was not mentioned at all in the list, this year they are listed as one of just two systems to watch.

The report finds that concrete5 "showed the largest growth of any system in the Developer Support metric." The CMS also showed massive gains in search engine ranking and search interest, as well as a very popular project site. In summary, the report states:

"It has only been in the market in its present form since 2008. We feel the future looks bright for concrete5"

Read the full report here:

http://www.waterandstone.com/book/2010-open-source-cms-market-share-report


c5bundle.net is an independent group which is not affiliated with the core team behind concrete5 at all, and periodically undercuts the marketplace add-on price points dramatically.

We work with 3rd party developers who have approved add-ons in the marketplace and clump a bunch of software together into one big archive you can buy at an insane discount. (over 90% off!)

Check out their current deal >


Check out this Developer Intro how-to we just added with the lead developer behind MojorMotor.


The latest concrete5 fives 26 bugs and contains improvements to the file uploading process. Bug fixes in full page caching and other features added in 5.4.1 make it recommended for all users of 5.4.1.1.

Full 5.4.1.1 release notes are here >

You can download concrete5 5.4.1 from here:


concrete5 is a content management system beloved by small businesses for its ease of use and stable flexibility. The CMS was originally designed to be a toolbox for web design firms providing custom design work. Over time the toolset has become so easy to use that clients are building their own basic sites with little to no technical know-how, and they're buying more and more prebuilt themes to make their websites look great.


The latest concrete5 contains a wealth of updates, including.

  • Full page and block caching, to improve the performance of concrete5 sites.
  • Major performance improvements, to both the editing and viewing experience
  • Significant file manager improvements, including saved searches, better column customization, the ability to reorder files in sets, and much more
  • A new stable version of TinyMCE (the rich text editor that concrete5 uses)
  • Lots of bug fixes and little feature improvements. View them all by visiting the full release notes.

Full 5.4.1 release notes are here >

You can download concrete5 5.4.1 from here:


On September 30, 2008, concrete5 version 1.0 was officially released. Since we were exhibiting at OSCON that year in August, we had a few release candidates and some beta versions available beforehand, but this was our first public, committed, upgrade-ready version, just in time for concrete5 to be named SourceForge's Project of the Month for October, 2008.

That was a great honor. I started thinking, though: how many people checked out concrete5 when it was PotM, decided it might not fit their needs, and never looked back? And how many users of version 4 have never seen some of the more humble roots of concrete5? It's with that in mind that I mark this two-year anniversary with a screenshot and feature retrospective, comparing version 5.0.0 with the about-to-be-released 5.4.1. We've come a long way.

Read more and view screenshots at andrewembler.com >


Okay so we routinely hear from people that have setup concrete5 on some cloud based web server and find it slow. My answer is routinely, "Well of course, what would you expect out of something called ‘the cloud' – speed?"

The cloud makes a lot of sense to me if you have a huge number of small computing tasks. Need to store a load of data? Sure. Want to convert a kaballion images from one format to another? Perfect solution. Even if you've got a simple webapp that you want to be able to replicate a million times some morning when you get Dugg – okay, as long as the app is pretty light weight and you design it with this in mind.


Hey! Andrew again, and I'm going to recap the news.

This Week's News

How we assign your karma raffle numbers

We have three databases – one for each type of contribution (Promotion, Helping People, and Developing). For each Karma point a user has in a silo they get a number of tickets assigned to their name so we end up with 1,000,000 total tickets. Then to build random numbers from the data points in the TOPCON video.

The Winners, and What They Got

Watch the video to see who won what.


Hey! Andrew again, and I'm going to recap the news.